As we move into the new year, we at KMUD Redwood Community Radio are grateful for another year with you. In the past twelve months, there has been a lot of change here at the station. We have welcomed new programmers, staff and volunteers, and said goodbye to some beloved community members. As always, the show goes on. We are so grateful for the energy and support of our community, and are looking forward to new programs, exciting developments, and continued creativity here at the station.

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Redwood Community Radio is happy to announce the hire of Alyssa deLeon as Station Manager. She will start on Friday, August 23rd. DeLeon commented, “I grew up listening to KMUD on dirt roads and am so excited to be a part of the family. I’m excited to bring my leadership, creativity and organizational skills to KMUD and…

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Help upgrade KMUE button

Transmitter upgrades to start this week.

Soon, three of Redwood Community Radio’s four signals will be improved to provide listeners with better service, including HD radio. Most dramatically, KMUE’s power will increase from the current 1.25 kilowatts to 10 kW, using new and much more reliable equipment. Its frequency will move from 88.3 to 88.1, just a click to the left.

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The funding for all this comes from two principal sources: the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the property bequeathed RCR by classical programmer Marian Mapes-Bouck. Of course, we need and welcome additional donations from the communities we serve.

Listeners need not worry about running out to buy new radios. The new, digital signal will be bundled with an analog version, which is what RCR uses now. This means that existing radios will continue to function as they do now. HD radios (HD stands for “hybrid digital”) will receive a signal that does not suffer from interference, multipath, or fade like analog FM does. What is more, HD radio offers the possibility of additional channels on the same frequency. RCR might, for example, broadcast community meetings in their entirety instead of the abbreviated versions necessitated by present programming capabilities.

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Passing through Garberville over the holidays, driving north on the Redwood Highway, my family and I caught the first strains of techno music coming in over the airwaves: La Roux's “I'm Not Your Toy,” the first song in that Friday's episode of the South Fork News, a weekly KMUD radio show produced by South Fork High School students.…

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